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The Parents' Review

A Monthly Magazine of Home-Training and Culture

Edited by Charlotte Mason.

"Education is an atmosphere, a discipline, a life."
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Notes and Queries.


Volume 1, 1890/91, pg. 76


We have received some valuable "Notes," but do not publish all in this number, partly, that we may first take an opportunity to make clear to our readers the design of our "Notes and Queries" pages.

"Notes" are suggestions (bearing on any and every subject connected with the bringing up of "children," of all ages) which are open to and invite discussion.

"Queries" cover the same ground in the form which the word suggests -- questions, that is, whether to be answered by a member of the Correspondence Syndicate or by readers of the Parents' Review.

In "Notes and Queries" we open, practically, a parents' debating club, and reserve to ourselves the power to devote our "Notes and Queries" pages to a debate on any one subject. We do not hold ourselves responsible for opinions advance in these pages. Members of the Correspondence Syndicate will sign their answers with the initials, C.S.

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Until what age ought a child to have a warm bath every evening? The morning cold bath is always continued; but is not a hot daily bath too relaxing? -- INQUIRER.

I am very anxious to make the most of my time, yet each evening I seem to have left a number of things undone. Perhaps the editor, or some of the readers of the Parents' Review, can give me some help? With our permission, I will name the things I ought to do, and a few of those I would like to do. I have four children, from one to seven years of age, and one nurse. In the morning I have to arrange the meals, &c., dust the drawing-room, attend to the plants, take charge of the children wile the nurse tidies the night nursery, and teach the two elder children; then I must practice with the eldest boy, who learns violin. When the weather is fine, the children go out for about two hours before dinner, and I have that time as a rule to myself. After dinner I go to the nursery while the nurse dines; and at 5:30 we commence to put the babies to bed. Besides doing these things, which I regard as absolute duties, i am very fond of music and painting, and must read to keep abreast of the times; and I have many social duties to perform. The nurse and I also make all the children's clothes. I can truly say I am sometimes almost distracted. How is a mother to fulfill her duties? -- MATER



Typed by Mary Frances, August 2015