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The Parents' Review

A Monthly Magazine of Home-Training and Culture

Edited by Charlotte Mason.

"Education is an atmosphere, a discipline, a life."
______________________________________
Our Work.

Volume 12, no. 9, 1901, pg. 152


The Annual Conference. - At the request of the President the Conference will being on May 14th instead of May 7th.

To avoid disappointment in future, Miss Russell, Sec. at the Central Office, would like to remind callers that she is sure to be in the Office only between 2 and 4 o'clock daily, except Saturdays. She will, however, be glad to make appointments if wished. Miss Russell would also ask all Students of House of Education to inform her at once of any change of address.

House of Education.

Examination in Practical Teaching and in the History, Theory and Methods of Teaching. December, 1900, Class List.

(Fall marks for each subject 120.)

Class I.

Teaching.
     Paper I.
     Paper II.
     Paper III.
     Total

K. R. Hammond. (Special Distinction)
     120
     86
     113
     99
     418

G. M. Bradley.
     90
     89
     93
     72
     344

A. Shirrefs GordonN.
     95
     94
     87
     68
     344

E. S. Mence.
     90
     77
     93
     73
     333

F. White.
     85
     75
     95
     76
     331

C. B. Huston.
     95
     85
     85
     64
     329

J. Sergeant.
     85
     70
     70
     90
     315

E. Saunders.
     85
     80
     80
     69
     314

G. Wilkinson.
     90
     76
     83
     60
     309

M. M. Kerr.
     85
     68
     78
     69
     300

Class II.

E. Smith.
     70
     61
     79
     66
     276

G. Edwards
     80
     46
     66
     50
     242

E. Persse.
     75
     54
     73
     35
     237

Class III.

B. Steele.
     60
     33
     47
     57
     197

M. F. Hodge.
     70
     23
     48
     24
     165


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The National Health Society's Examination on Hygiene.

December, 1900, Class List.

Passed: - E. L. Lawrence, S. Hirtzel, J. W. Devonshire, H. M. Lake, L. Bagnall, A. M. Cowdrey, R. M. Williams, H. G. Russell.


          ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ *


Meeting at Copenhagen.

On Nov. 24th the Danish Froebel Union, kindly invited by Miss Elizabeth Gad, principal of the Private School of Rosenvienget, had joined a large number of parents and teachers in the rooms at the named school. In arranging such parents' meetings, we follow the example of the P.N.E.U. and several German Froebel Unions.

Miss Gad firstly gave a short address on the relations of home and school. We quote the following words:--

"An intimate relation, a right and mutual understanding should ever be considered the condition of successful educational work, whose aim is the development of an immortal soul. In a large town as Copenhagen is, there are many difficulties to master, but we are hoping that one or two yearly meeting as this, to discuss matters of the highest interest for all parents and educators, should be welcomed by the homes of our children.

"Some signs make us conclude that a new era is inaugurated in respect of education. From different countries voices are heard, craving that in all kinds of education and tuition, the development of character and heart should prevail upon the one-sided furthering of intellectual gifts. Testimony thereof is the English Association P.N.E.U., founded by Miss Charlotte Mason, in order to forward the mutual understanding of home and school, that the homes might take up their part of the educational work, especially that part whose best support and pillar is the Book of all books.

"Association is the motto of the day; the sentence, union fait la force, ["unity is strength"] when taken in its right meaning, recalls the words of our Lord (St. Matt. xviii. 20): 'Where two or three are together in my name, there am I in the midst.'

"The named union has had considerable progress and now counts thousands of members in different parts of the world. The Danish Froebel Union, founded last year with a similar aim, has therefore affiliated its efforts with those of P.N.E.U., particularly in regard to mutual exchange of writings. I make use of the opportunity to recommend Miss Mason's book on Home Education to all parents. Especially I agree with her in this, which is the real thread in all her writing, that in all our work we should strive to turn the child's eye toward the things above us."

The Rev. Mr. Krag then delivered a lecture on "The Leading Force in Education."

In the children there is a wonderful force of uniting and joining. Even he whose critical mind disdains the highest powers of life, is unable to resist the innocence of childhood. As an instance, the lecturer mentioned a remembrance from his pastorship. Once he was summoned to go to a dying man, well known as indifferent to, or an enemy of the Creed. At his bed he found the man's former nurse with her little daughter of eight years. When they had spoken awhile about religious matters, the little one burst out: "This evening at eight o'clock when going to bed, I shall pray for thy soul." The words of the little girl deeply impressed the dying man and when the evening, his last, came, his mind was opened and he sought force and consolation from above.

The scripture gives us many a good advice in regard of education. Solomon describe the good and hearty wife, centre and pillar of the house; on other pages we find warnings against idleness and fancy of dress. The story of Jesus as a boy of twelve years is also important. On the whole, scripture sets up a scope and ideal of education: Man, made in God's image, is to develop this likeness by doing as Jesus in his Father's work. And a greater and nobler ideal than that given by Jesus in His word and work never has been seen, this fact is granted as well by those who believe in God as by their antagonists. But to realize this ideal, there is need of mutual support of all educational powers, especially of home and school. Rev. Mr. Krag's interesting and thoughtful address opened an animated discussion. Mr. Banzert laid great stress on the harmony of home and school. It was a sad thing, that young people nowadays often neglected their homes. Rev. Peterson and Principal Miss Jeppesen laid great weight on a religious fundament of the home life; Miss Rudolph, board school teacher, and Mrs. Hedevig Bagger mentioned the development of the child's will. Rev. Mr. Krag emphasized that all religious training ought to be real, and founded in real life, not only in dogmatic sentences. Some of the audience discussed the best ways for educational purposes, and finally Mr. Bagger, headmaster of the school of Istedgare, reminded us of Froebel as the great student of childhood, setting as the highest educational aim Man's Godlikeness.


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