AmblesideOnline for Groups Form 2 A

Weekly schedule is here.

Table of Contents:

Key: (What do all those symbols mean?)
Book titles are linked to Project Gutenberg (which offers free etexts in a variety of formats) or other online text when no Project Gutenberg text is available.
β - manybooks.net, another free ebook site.
α - free etext at archive.org.
K - free Kindle text from amazon.com.
(£) Living Books Press purchase using AO's amazon.com affiliate link.
($amzn) - book purchase using AO's amazon.com affiliate link.
(K) - Kindle purchase using AO's amazon.com affiliate link.
Λ - free audiobook at Lit2Go
Ω - free audiobook at Librivox [2]
- other free audiobook source
[0] - Click the bracketed numeral to view any notes about the book near the bottom of the page.
[0] - red footnotes indicate a heads-up for parents about the title. We cannot foresee every incident that might potentially be an issue to everyone, but we have red-flagged those that are commonly a concern.
AmblesideOnline is part of Amazon.com's Affiliate program. If you use the Amazon links, we receive a small commission which enables us to cover the costs of keeping the website and curriculum. Amazon links are identified like this: ($amzn) or (K), but we have provided links to free and alternate sources as well.

Numbers preceding book titles refer to which term the book is used:
¹ Term 1 ² Term 2 ³ Term 3


In order to complete the curriculum additional instruction should be provided in the following areas.


Daily Lessons:


Weekly Lessons:





Bible [6]


History: 1640-1780


History Tales and/or Biography


Geography

In addition, these geography concepts should be explained and taught this year: [24]


Natural History/Science


Penmanship/Copywork

A curriculum or program for handwriting is not necessary, but if you want to use one, these are some we've used and can suggest:


Mathematics

Select a program from our page of Math Options.


Foreign Language

Latin


Poetry [27]


Literature


Art


Music


Physical Education


Additional Books for Free Reading [34]


If you would like some easier, but still excellent, living books, for a Form 2 student to read independently for free reading, consider choosing from this list:



Footnotes


2. Audiobooks: While links to audio books are added as a courtesy, Miss Mason's approach to grammar and composition is heavily dependent upon the children receiving an immense amount of visual exposure to the written word over many years, so parents should exercise extreme caution in how many audiobooks they use each year. Our brains just work differently when we see the words. (Cindy Rollins did a Circe Mason Jar podcast that included the role of audiobooks with difficult books.) For children who have difficulty reading, one solution is to have them follow the audio version along in a written text.
Librivox free audio is done by volunteers, and some are better than others. Heidi Nash has a list of some favorite Librivox readers. Be aware that apps, including Librivox, that have clickable ads can open a browser and allow children unfiltered access to the internet, even when browsers have been disabled by the parent. There are options: either download mp3 files from Librivox and listen without the app, or only install the app on a parent-controlled device. Librivox has a pay option to turn off ads. (Back)


4. Timeline: At this age, students should be keeping a simple, single-page timeline of major events and a Book of Centuries. Instructions for making your own timelines and charts are included in these Parents' Review articles: Book of the Centuries; Teaching Chronology; The Correlation of Lessons. For more details about the why, when, how of keeping CM timelines (and other notebooks), we recommend Laurie Bestvater's book, The Living Page ($amzn). (Back)


6. It is a good idea for children to become accustomed to the language and flow of the King James Version of the Bible, as a familiarity with King James English will make other literature more accessible. For more about this, read Lynn Bruce's article on the King James Version by clicking here.
Optional Bible Resources: Bible Gateway has many versions of the Bible online. Timeline; Study questions with maps. (Back)


8. This Country of Ours: Charles I-George III this year.
Term 1: ch 29-40 (Charles I-Charles II/Anne, 1636-1680)
Term 2: ch 41-51 (George I-George III 1723-1766)
Term 3: ch 52-63 (George III, 1765-1782)
Be aware that the edition for sale from Wilder Publications has no Table of Contents or chapter numbers. Public domain texts are available for anyone to copy, paste and publish, and many new companies are springing up publishing and selling these texts without editing for typos.
For planning purposes, there is a Table of Contents with dates for This Country of Ours here. (Back)


9. Answering the Cry for Freedom: This book is scheduled over three years. Please note that the most offensive racial epithet is included in chapter 2, about Agrippa Hull, as part of a quote. We suggest reading this aloud and skipping or replacing the word. Additionally, there is a reference to amputation without anesthesia. (Back)


10. There are various editions of this book. If you have the older version, there is an alternate weekly schedule here; if you have the newer Expanded Edition by Joanna Foster published by Beautiful Feet Books, there's an alternate weekly schedule here.
(Back)


12. Trial and Triumph: Descriptions of some trials of the Christians may be intense; preview chapters to determine suitablity based on their student's sensitivities. If you prefer, you can skip this book and cover church history in Form 3 with a different book, Saints and Heroes by George Hodges.
This book tells church history from a definite Protestant perspective; some may wish to skip this book or find an alternative. (Back)


14. Isaac Newton: If you already have the Sower Series biography of Isaac Newton by John Hudson Tiner, feel free to use that. If you need something online, there is a chapter about Isaac Newton in Robert S. Ball's Great Astronomers. β α ($earch) K
There's also a chapter on Newton in Nathaniel Hawthorne's True Stories from History and Biography. α [4]


16. Chapter 3, p. 17 of the Abigail Adams book contains this paragraph - 'Their love was growing giddy and passionate. Increasingly their meetings started with conversation, but quickly turned to lovemaking that pushed hard against the bounds of prudence. Both had so much -- yearning, called 'excessive sensibility,' that they actually became ill from anxiety and anticipation as the years of courtship continued.' The word 'lovemaking' is used in the old context of courting, but today's Hollywood movies have changed our perspective on the word. If you're using the 36-week schedule posted, this chapter is scheduled in week 15. (Back)


18. Minn of the Mississippi: These links have information and/or maps about the Mississippi River Page: The Great River; Map; Wikipedia. Beautiful Feet Books sells a set of maps for the Holling books; click on the link and then do a search for Holling Maps. (Back)


20. Material World/What the World Eats - How to use these books:
Leave them out, preferably near a globe or world map, and browse through them together from time to time.
Leave them out, browse through them and maybe once a month pick a country that especially interests your child. Look it up (briefly) on Wikipedia or in a good Atlas. Read a little bit more about it. Find it on a map or globe.
If your child is interested, he can pursue additional research in his free time and learn more about countries that particularly interest him, but this should be his own delight directed study or hobby.
How not to use these books: as the basis of a unit study or a burdensome checklist of additional tasks to fulfill.
Note: Material World: pg 16 and pg 70 have some National Geographic types of photos that may need screening.
Hungry Planet: What the World Eats by Peter Menzel and Faith D'Aluisio looks similar to What the World Eats; we think it could be used interchangeably. ($amzn) (Back)


22. Geography. Geosafari (available now on CD-rom) would be sufficient. SeterraOnline offers Free Map Quiz Games. If you have an iPad or iPhone, TapQuiz is a free map quiz app. (Back)


24. Geography: The Following geography concepts should be explained and taught this year; a book is not necessary as these can be explained informally during walks and outings. AO's complete list of geography topics is here.


26. Madam How and Lady Why: This year, the first half of the book is covered:
Term 1: The Glen, Earthquakes
Term 2: Volcanos, Transformations of a Grain of Soil
Term 3: The Ice-Plough, The True Fairy-Tale
Anne White has formatted the text with her study notes into separate volumes. Volume 1, "A Walk Through the Glen," is scheduled this year. Volume 2, "Further Afield," is scheduled next year.
If you'd like a copy of just the Walk Through The Glen text with a few edits (mostly for comments that would be considered racist by today's standards) for your student to read along, you can access that here.
The text with Anne White's study guide which is linked above is recommended but not required. If you prefer just the original book without the study guide or edits, it is available at these links: Project Gutenberg β α ($amzn) (£) Ω K There's a schedule that lines up with Anne's study guide here. Groups 2B lines up with Year 4 on that schedule.
Madam How and Lady Why is scheduled slowly over two years. This is an earth science book; if you use the study guide, you'll see that it takes time to adequately cover the subject matter. Researching the topics is what makes this useful as a science book.

Of what value is an old science book like Madam How and Lady Why? Apart from the superior writing quality, the best thing you can get out of old science books is a strong sense that science is a constantly changing thing, and that the "scientific evidence/theory/conclusion" of today can be debunked in a year, or two, or ten. Children should learn to take the words "Scientists think . . ." for exactly what they are worth (always worth considering, but never to be considered the final word). Reading older books will help you develop that sense.
Note on Kingsley's "old earth" comments: During the era when Madam How and Lady Why was written, there was no "young earth" discussion out there: evidence seemed to show an old earth, and the Church of England (Charles Kingsley was a clergyman), by and large, accepted a kind of theistic evolution.
This book is invaluable for understanding the deeper ideas of how to approach science. If you do nothing else with this book, at the very least, read the preface and chapter 8 (Madam How's Two Sons) -- that's the bare minimum, but, really, this whole book is truly worthwhile. Some parents are hesitant to use this book because of outdated science information; keep in mind that whatever is current, accurate and up to date changes all the time. Even if you buy a current science book today, there is material in it that is already out of date and will be defunct next year. Some science teachers complain that in some areas what is currently held as true changes so fast that they think science would be best taught using science journals as the text, and even then, in some topics, over half of what is published in journals ends up being retracted later. But that's data, and it's easy to correct outdated data. The ideas in this book are the foundation of a CM philosophy. This is a book to read together with your kids, to discuss, to research together. Some of the style of the writing can be off-putting, but that is also something that could become an advantage: use it as a writing or narration project, asking your student to 'retell what the author is getting at, but in current terms.' (Back)


27. Poetry: How do you "do" poetry? Simply read it and enjoy it, re-read it, read it again and listen to the sound of the phrases, let them paint a word picture in your mind. Do you feel like you need more direction? How to Read a Poem: Based on the Billy Collins Poem "Introduction to Poetry" by Tania Runyan is "less as an instructional book and more of an invitation." This is a suggested optional parent resource that encourages you read poetry for enjoyment. (Back)


28. The Sea Around Us: If you're curious why this book is scheduled, The Guardian has an article that describes The Sea Around Us as "the first, and still perhaps the best science bestseller. . . The reader is immersed in a new and wonderful world, one where everything really is connected to everything else. This sense of the sea and all its constituents as part of an interrelated system infuses the entire book."
The special edition we've linked "features a new chapter written by Jeffrey Levinton, a leading expert in marine ecology, that brings the scientific side of The Sea Around Us completely up to date. Levinton incorporates the most recent thinking on continental drift, coral reefs, the spread of the ocean floor, the deterioration of the oceans, mass extinction of sea life, and many other topics." ($amzn) (Back)


28a. 'The Story of Inventions' is online, except for the last 2 chapters, which were a later addition and still copyrighted. The online edition does not have the two later chapters. If you have the second edition, the chapter order may not match the AO schedule. AO member Amy H. posted a revised list on her blog here. Great Inventors and Their Inventions by Frank P. Bachman (£) is an earlier version of the same book. If you have a copy, you can substitute. Or, boys might enjoy War Inventions by Charles R. Gibson (the Advisory hasn't read this yet.) All About Famous Inventors and Their Inventions α by Fletcher Pratt is similar; The Story of Great Inventions by Elmer Ellsworth Burns α might be another option. Chapter 10: Watch 6 min video on Medieval Manuscripts (Back)


30. Age of Fable, used over three years, is a book about Greek mythology, and some editions use illustrations of nudes, which some might find objectionable. This year: Preface to ch 14 (Minerva-Niobe)
Term 1: Preface to ch 4 (Diana and Actaeon)
Term 2: ch 4 (Latona and the rustics) to ch 8 (Apollo and Hyacinthus)
Term 3: ch 9 (Ceyx and Halcyone) to ch 14 (Niobe) (Back)


32. Robinson Crusoe: Yes, this is a hard book. It's hard for a reason. It's going to stretch and grow your student's ability to read and comprehend -- the Robinson Crusoe, Jungle Book, and Children of the New Forest he learns to manage now will prepare him for Oliver Twist, Age of Fable, and Sleepy Hollow in Form 2. This is how Form 3 students can read Churchill, Ivanhoe and Utopia later. It's a growing process that happens step by step, book by book. It's okay that it's hard at first. Read smaller portions, buddy-read (take turns paragraph by paragraph), let the child read along while listening to an audio version (make sure he's seeing the words/sentences). It's okay to use alternate ways of reading the book. But please, please . . . read the book. Once you have the experience of growing into a book as you read, it will be easier to persevere in the future when a book feels hard at first. The book starts slow, but most students end up loving it. Robinson Crusoe Book II, The Further Adventures, in which Crusoe returns to the island and goes to Madagascar, Asia and Siberia, is not scheduled and is not included in most versions of the book. (If you're using an undivided text that includes both books, Book 1 ends at "All these things, with some very surprising incidents in some new adventures of my own, for ten years more I may, perhaps, give a further account of hereafter." and Book 2 begins at "That homely proverb used on so many occasions in England, viz. 'That what is bred in the bone will not go out of the flesh,' was never more verified than in the story of my Life.") Robinson Crusoe was worked into the 36-week AO schedule using an edition that had 27 chapters. If you use the Project Gutenberg etext or an edition that has no chapters, you may find this breakdown more useful. (Back)


34. Free Reading books are books that no child should miss, but rather than overloading school time, these can be read during free time. No narrations need be required from these books. Advisory member Wendi C. suggests, "How you handle these is up to you . . ." (more) Students should understand that historical fiction, while often well-researched, is still fiction, and contains the author's ideas of how things might have happened. Books with asterisks pertain to that term's historical studies. (Back)




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Last update Oct. 6, 2020