Ambleside Online: Grammar Worksheets


Worksheet #1
(From Peter Rabbit, by Beatrix Potter)

Put parentheses around each prepositional phrase, like this: (around each phrase).Remember! A prepositional phrase is the preposition, plus whatever answers the question, "whom or what?"

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Mr. McGregor was quite sure that Peter was somewhere in the toolshed, perhaps hidden underneath a flower-pot. He began to turn them over carefully, looking under each.Presently Peter sneezed-- "Kertyschoo!" Mr. McGregor was after him in no time, and tried to put his foot upon Peter, who jumped out of a window, upsetting three plants. The window was too small for Mr. McGregor, and he was tired of running after Peter. He went back to his work. Peter sat down to rest; he was out of breath and trembling with fright, and he had not the least idea which way to go. Also he was very damp with sitting in that can.





Worksheet #2
(From Stories of the Pilgrims, by Margaret Pumphrey)

Put parentheses around each prepositional phrase, like this: (around each phrase). Remember! A prepositional phrase is the preposition, plus whatever answers the question, "whom or what?"

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It was a day of feasting in the village. More Indians came from their homes in the woods. More white men came from the ship. Captain George Weymouth gave the chief a present. It was a string of blue beads. The chief was pleased. He put the beads around his neck. He and Captain George Weymouth sat on a deerkskin in front of the chief's house. The other white men sat near them.An old man of the tribe brought out his drum. He played and some of the young Indian men danced. They made so much dust that the chief told them to stop.





Worksheet #3
(From The Silver Chair, by C.S. Lewis)

Put parentheses around each prepositional phrase, like this: (around each phrase). Remember! A prepositional phrase is the preposition, plus whatever answers the question, "whom or what?" After you find the prepositional phrases, look for the verbs and draw a double line under each one

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Now, for the first time, she heard the noise of waves and the crying of seagulls. And now, too, she smelled the smell of the sea. There was no mistake about her speed now. She saw two waves meet with a smack and a spout of foam go up between them; but she had hardly seen it before it was a hundred yards behind her. The land was getting nearer at a great pace. She could see mountains far inland, and other nearer mountains on her left. She could see bays and headland, woods and fields, stretches of sandy beach. The sound of waves breaking on the shore was growing louder every second and drowning the other sea noises.





Worksheet #4
(From Little House in the Big Woods, by Laura Ingalls Wilder)

Put parentheses around each prepositional phrase, like this: (around each phrase). Remember! A prepositional phrase is the preposition, plus whatever answers the question, "whom or what?" After you find the prepositional phrases, look for the verbs and draw a double line under each one.

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One morning Pa went away before daylight with the horses and wagon, and that night he came home with a wagonload of fish. The big wagon box was piled full, and some of the fish were as big as Laura. Pa had gone to Lake Pepin and caught them all with a net. Ma cut large slices of flaky white fish, without one bone, for Laura and Mary. All they did not eat fresh was salted down in barrels for the winter.




Worksheet #5
(From Little House in the Big Woods, by Laura Ingalls Wilder)

Put parentheses around each prepositional phrase, like this: (around each phrase). Remember! A prepositional phrase is the preposition, plus whatever answers the question, "whom or what?" After you find the prepositional phrases, look for the verbs and draw a double line under each one.

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Every day Grandpa puts on his boots and his warm coast and his fur cap and he goes out into the snowy woods and gathers the sap.With a barrel on a sled, he drives from tree to tree and empties the sap from the buckets into the barrel.Then he hauls it to a big iron kettle, that hangs by a chain from a cross-timber between two trees.He empties the sap into the iron kettle.There is a big bonfire under the kettle, and the sap boils, and Grandpa watches it carefully.




Worksheet #6
(From the Children's Homer--I think--or possibly Tales of Troy and Greece, by Andrew Lang)

Put parentheses around each prepositional phrase, like this: (around each phrase). Remember! A prepositional phrase is the preposition, plus whatever answers the question, "whom or what?" After you find the prepositional phrases, look for the verbs and draw a double line under each one, and a single line under the subject.

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Hector too leaped from the chariot and took his sword in hand. Their men joined Patroklos and joined Hector and the battle began beside the body of Hector's charioteer. Three times did Patroklos rush against the ranks of the Trojans and nine warriors did he slay at each onset.





Worksheet #7
(From The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, by C.S. Lewis)

Put parentheses around each prepositional phrase, like this: (around each phrase). Remember! A prepositional phrase is the preposition, plus whatever answers the question, "whom or what?" After you find the prepositional phrases, look for the verbs and draw a double line under each one, and a single line under the subject.

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There was soft grass on both sides of the river, and beyond the grass, tress and bushes sloped up to the bases of the cliffs. There must have been some wonderful flowering shrubs hidden in that shadowy undergrowth for the whole glade was full of the most delicious smells.




Worksheet #8
(From Dr. DoLittle, by Hugh Long)

Put parentheses around each prepositional phrase, like this: (around each phrase). Remember! A prepositional phrase is the preposition, plus whatever answers the question, "whom or what?" After you find the prepositional phrases, look for the verbs and draw a double line under each one, and a single line under the subject.

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Queen Ermintrude had never in her life seen her husband so terrible as he got that night. He gnashed his teeth with rage. He called everybody a fool. He threw his toothbrush at the palace cat. He rushed around in his nightshirt and woke up all his army and sent them into the jungle to catch the Doctor.




Worksheet #9
(From Dr. DoLittle, by Hugh Long)

Put parentheses around each prepositional phrase, like this: (around each phrase).Remember! A prepositional phrase is the preposition, plus whatever answers the question, "whom or what?" After you find the prepositional phrases, look for the verbs and draw a double line under each one, and a single line under the subject.

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Presently there was a big BANG! The ship stopped and rolled over on its side. "What's happened," asked the Doctor, coming up from downstairs. "I'm not sure," said the parrot; "but I think we're ship-wrecked. Tell the duck to get out and see." So Dab-Dab dived right down under the waves.